Inga Saffron, the Inquirer’s Pulitzer-prize winning architecture critic, wrote about the impact of the smartphone on Philadelphia on Dec. 27:

If the Aughts were a decade of recovery, when Philadelphia emerged from a half-century slide and began growing its population again, this has been the decade of disruption. Blame it on Apple’s juice.

In a matter of a few years, this leisurely and livable city found itself wrestling with an array of unintended consequences …

Although the iPhone came on the market in 2007, followed by the Android in 2009, its effects weren’t felt on the city’s urban form until the start of what we’ll probably end up calling the Teens. In a matter of a few years, this leisurely and livable city found itself wrestling with an array of unintended consequences, including gentrification, traffic congestion, a demolition free-for-all, and upheavals in its retail districts.

Read more here.

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